Gefen DVI Detective Comments

Well, here’s a product I didn’t know existed but was happy to find. About a year ago I built a new machine for the studio, mostly to run Lightroom. I like Lightroom and want to love it, but have had speed problems with it since day one. So I built a quad core machine with 8gb ram, fast ATI card (had conflicts with the Nvidia) and a serious RAID 6 controller from Areca for storage and cache. For my viewing pleasure I got two 27″ displays from Doublesight and glued it all together with Vista 64. The problems began when I had to install a couple of DVI video extension cables to the monitors. Every time the screen blanker kicked in, or when the machine was restarted or came out of sleep mode, the monitors wouldn’t come up at the right resolution or even left to right sequence. About half the time I had to go in and reset the layout and resolution. It was one of those really frustrating things that I let go for two long.

While I was trying to get some HDMI problems solved (another day, another rant!) I asked John Johns, the video wizard at In-Sync, Inc. in Dallas, what he would recommend. He referred me to Gefen, a company that makes a crazy array of video conversion boxes. On their website I found a little box called the DVI Detective and an explanation of what the problem was with my monitors (and my HDMI troubles). Both of those connections transmit an EDID code. According to Wikipedia: “Extended display identification data (EDID) is a data structure provided by a computer display to describe its capabilities to a graphics card. It is what enables a modern personal computer to know what kind of monitor is connected.” As with many things electronic, that doesn’t always work out in practice. What was happening was the EDID wasn’t being picked up and weird things were happening.

The DVI Detective goes inline between the computer and the monitor. You power it up with the included wallwart, push a tiny button on the little box, a light flashes telling you the code is being received and stored, you flip a switch to lock the setting – and you’re done. The power can now be unplugged. I was hesitant to spend 2 x $60 (from Buy.com) on these little gizmos but my problem is completely solved. I love these things.

They are tiny boxes and come with nice, stout turn around DVI patch cables. A solid product that does exactly what it claims to with very little setup. This is what the mess looks like behind my monitors until I dress this up a little:

gefen-dvi-detective2

UPDATE: 7-4-09
I’ve been using the Gefen DVI Detective boxes for a few weeks now and I can happily report that they have completely solved the problems I was having! Money well spent.